About Me

I learned to love the journey, not the destination.I learned that this is not a dress rehearsal, and that today is the only guarantee you get.-Anna Quindlen Credit: SQNSport

I learned to love the journey, not the destination.I learned that this is not a dress rehearsal, and that today is the only guarantee you get.-Anna Quindlen
Credit: SQNSport

About Me

I have been coaching and helping people improve their fitness for over three decades. My passion is to help you become stronger for activities you love, and to guide you towards your specific goals. If you have recurring muscle and joint pain, I can help you identify musculoskeletal imbalances that are either causing or contributing to your pain, so you can enjoy life to the fullest.

I work with top-level athletes in the sports-oriented town of Sun Valley, and regular amazing folks. I also know from experience the challenges we face when rebounding from injuries, surgeries or chronic conditions.

In 2004 I was struck with spondylolisthesis, a painful slipped disc in my lower back. I was living with chronic pain. After undergoing surgery to fix my back I continued to focus and expand my education on the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex, and how to manage and prevent back pain. Flash forward to the present, I am now a recognized Corrective Exercise Specialist in The BioMechanics Method ( TBMM-CES ).

Since 2000 I have also studied yoga with world-renowned yoga teachers, so if you train with me, you will surely do some yoga. Balance is huge for people over 40. So is the necessity of bringing together muscles and mind to move more efficiently, to relax when we need to relax, and to be powerful when power is needed. For example, have you ever noticed that a great skier’s upper body is always relaxed?

When you first begin working with me, you will undergo a comprehensive musculoskeletal assessment and health history. Results from this assessment then guides us to understand what muscles and other soft tissue are contributing to your condition. Each program is designed specifically for your needs and goals. We’ll look at any musculoskeletal imbalances and design a corrective exercise program to help you move better, if that’s what you are more interested in. If your goal is weight loss, we incorporate full body moves with high metabolic cost, as I want your hour with me to count. Whether your goal is fat loss, feeling better, or returning to your favorite sport, I will bring abundant enthusiasm and the best programming to design your workout. ( If you train with me I can guarantee you that you will not be sore on the first day of ski season.)

As a former junior ski racer, my greatest passion skiing. I love to run, bike, practice yoga, and rock climb, taking me to the cliffs of the Greek Islands, Sardinia, Italy, Spain, Mexico and Thailand. Hiking with our Golden Retriever, Izzy, is also high on my list of things I love to do.

Here is a list of my credentials:

  • Corrective Exercise Specialist in The Biomechanics Method ( TBMM-CES )
  • American College of Sports Medicine ( ACSM ) Certified Exercise Physiologist 
  • American Council on Exercise (gold level)
  • Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research
  • Active Isolated Strengthening Therapist (a method of fascia release used to facilitate stretching)
  •  International Dance Exercise Association Elite Level Personal Trainer  ( the highest level of achievement in the personal fitness training industry)
  • TRX Suspension training coach.
  • Author of the Essential Core Poster ( click on link front page ! )
  • Author of a popular monthly health and fitness column for the Idaho Mountain Express
  • Yoga training with www.judithlasater.com, www.seanecorn.com, and www.erich schiffman.com
  • YMCA Group Exercise Leader

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Recent Posts

Fix your pain with self-myofascial release

Tennis ball rolling can improve flexibility and restore movement function

If you feel sore and stiff, you might want to consider foam or ball rolling. Whether you’ve skied too hard, or overdone any activity, you can fix your post-exercise pain with a technique called self-myofascial release. Rolling can improve flexibility, restore movement function and help with delayed onset muscle soreness. The technique also relaxes stored tension in the muscle and releases endorphins to help reduce pain.

Combining rolling an area of muscle with an immediate stretch for that particular muscle is the best strategy for fixing tight, sore muscles. Research shows a greater improvement in joint range of motion compared to stretching or foam rolling alone.

It may sound technical, but self-myofascial release is really a simple concept. Myofascial refers to muscles and fascia; the prefix myo means “muscle.” Self-myofascial release is basically massage, where external pressure is applied to sensitive areas in the muscle, which are either tight, inflexible, knotted or contain scar tissue. The sustained pressure stimulates circulation to the area and increases flexibility.

There’s a reason muscles feel tired and tight either from doing too much or doing too little exercise. The benefits of exercise are myriad, but there is a downside of repeated loads on the body: microscopic damage in muscle and fascia. That typically results in sore or tight muscles, or diminished movement quality. Massage and trigger point therapies by clinicians can help, but you can also fix your own pain at home with a roller or balls.

There are two kinds of self -myofascial release techniques: general and specific. General involves using a foam roller for larger muscles, such as the front thighs. More specific would mean working on your calf or foot, where tennis balls, golf balls, baseballs, or other massage tools can pinpoint a precise area of muscle. The specificity of using a tennis ball is also practical if you’re traveling and can’t take a foam roller along with you.

Rolling and athletic performance

The influence of rolling on athletic performance remains unclear. A review of nine studies reported no change in vertical jumps or multi-directional sprints. In another study of 24 athletes published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, joint range of motion increased but power and agility declined after five minutes of rolling. For pre-event warm-ups, the recommendations are not to roll for more than a minute to prevent power loss.

How to roll

For the rest of us, at present there is little concern regarding how long you roll. Research suggests five seconds to three minutes, or three sets of thirty seconds on each area in need. Once you find an area in the muscle that’s restricted and tight, take your time to explore the tight spots with either a roller or a ball. Try to relax to allow the hormones to release into your body to encourage further relaxation.

Watch the link for an example of neck myofascial release combined with a neck stretch at

vimeo.com/516004574.

https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/community/fitness-guru/article_ac72a5dc-77bd-11eb-8267-ebbc34eee6d4.html

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