Personal Training

Personal Training

The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe to match your nature with Nature. ~ Joseph Campbell

The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe to match your nature with Nature. ~ Joseph Campbell

Maximize your time and energy to be the best you can be!
I am dedicated to offer you an exceptional personal training program that will help you achieve a higher level of health and fitness. The benefits that you may enjoy include increased energy levels, improved posture, weight loss, reduced joint stiffness, increased core strength, sport-specific conditioning, better stamina, and an improved sense of well being. I specialize in private and partner training programs, offered in one hour sessions. Most clients choose to work out with me for 1-2 training sessions a week. We typically meet at the Wood River YMCA in Ketchum, Idaho. If you prefer to work out at home, your program will be designed for that. Some exercises may require that you purchase a few very inexpensive items like a foam roller, or an exercise ball or bands.

Partner Training

Partner training is an affordable way to have personalized training and split the cost. Couples particularly enjoy the time interacting and encouraging their spouses, while having fun and working hard.

Small Group Training

Small group training keeps you engaged and moving. Clients enjoy the group dynamics and want to continue taking their training to the next level under the guidance of a personal coach. Three or four people split the cost.

 How Do We Start?

I ask you to fill out a physical readiness questionnaire, called a PAR-Q. This is a standard form that, depending on your answers, tells you whether or not you need to check with your doctor before you start or continue with your exercise program. Along with this, I ask you to fill out a health and lifestyle questionnaire that gives me more specific information about you.training

Your first session is critical to helping you set up a foundation for success. You will undergo a comprehensive musculoskeletal assessment to look at your body. Don’t worry, you can wear comfortable clothes! We might find imbalances that may be causing pain or dysfunction in other areas of your body. This assessment includes posture, both standing, and in real life. From here, we build a program that is tailored specifically to meet your needs, guaranteeing outstanding program results.

How much does it cost?

The fees for training are offered in to however many you’d like, small packages of 10 sessions, or larger ones, with a discount! Sessions are pre-paid, by check.

What do we do?
Unless you have specific concerns/goals, a well- rounded program needs to include the following:

  • Overall strength: I like exercises that incorporate full body movement, because in life and sports, we need to move well. It gives you better results overall.
  • Core Training : Your midsection provides the foundation for a stable center of gravity, which helps support your spine, enhance your posture, and prevent certain muscle-related injuries. (Essential Core / Copyright ) Having a strong core is crucial.
  • Balance and Coordination: You will get this automatically in your workouts because you won’t be using a lot of machines.
  • Flexibility: If you train with me, you will eventually be doing yoga! I incorporate specific flexibility, if necessary, throughout your workout.
  • Cardiovascular endurance: To be a regular exerciser, you have to find time in your schedule on an ongoing basis. I want to help you become more aware of the many opportunities to move more in your daily life.

 My Policies

I do require  24 hours’ notice when canceling an appointment.

Stretching out after a great TRX Suspension trainer workout

Stretching out after a great TRX Suspension trainer workout

photo

Recent Posts

Fix your pain with self-myofascial release

Tennis ball rolling can improve flexibility and restore movement function

If you feel sore and stiff, you might want to consider foam or ball rolling. Whether you’ve skied too hard, or overdone any activity, you can fix your post-exercise pain with a technique called self-myofascial release. Rolling can improve flexibility, restore movement function and help with delayed onset muscle soreness. The technique also relaxes stored tension in the muscle and releases endorphins to help reduce pain.

Combining rolling an area of muscle with an immediate stretch for that particular muscle is the best strategy for fixing tight, sore muscles. Research shows a greater improvement in joint range of motion compared to stretching or foam rolling alone.

It may sound technical, but self-myofascial release is really a simple concept. Myofascial refers to muscles and fascia; the prefix myo means “muscle.” Self-myofascial release is basically massage, where external pressure is applied to sensitive areas in the muscle, which are either tight, inflexible, knotted or contain scar tissue. The sustained pressure stimulates circulation to the area and increases flexibility.

There’s a reason muscles feel tired and tight either from doing too much or doing too little exercise. The benefits of exercise are myriad, but there is a downside of repeated loads on the body: microscopic damage in muscle and fascia. That typically results in sore or tight muscles, or diminished movement quality. Massage and trigger point therapies by clinicians can help, but you can also fix your own pain at home with a roller or balls.

There are two kinds of self -myofascial release techniques: general and specific. General involves using a foam roller for larger muscles, such as the front thighs. More specific would mean working on your calf or foot, where tennis balls, golf balls, baseballs, or other massage tools can pinpoint a precise area of muscle. The specificity of using a tennis ball is also practical if you’re traveling and can’t take a foam roller along with you.

Rolling and athletic performance

The influence of rolling on athletic performance remains unclear. A review of nine studies reported no change in vertical jumps or multi-directional sprints. In another study of 24 athletes published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, joint range of motion increased but power and agility declined after five minutes of rolling. For pre-event warm-ups, the recommendations are not to roll for more than a minute to prevent power loss.

How to roll

For the rest of us, at present there is little concern regarding how long you roll. Research suggests five seconds to three minutes, or three sets of thirty seconds on each area in need. Once you find an area in the muscle that’s restricted and tight, take your time to explore the tight spots with either a roller or a ball. Try to relax to allow the hormones to release into your body to encourage further relaxation.

Watch the link for an example of neck myofascial release combined with a neck stretch at

vimeo.com/516004574.

https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/community/fitness-guru/article_ac72a5dc-77bd-11eb-8267-ebbc34eee6d4.html

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